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[REMEZCLA MUSICA]

Me Siento Lonely: 10 Classic Breakup Tracks

BY Isabela Raygoza | PUBLISHED: Monday, July 25th, 2011
Me Siento Lonely: 10 Classic Breakup Tracks

Flashback! Back in the day when recording devices were new, people altered their representations to others, including their love expressions and courting styles accordingly to pop culture. Before then, men serenaded the ladies under their balconies, exchanged love letters, and took’em out on a stroll on an Oldsmobiles. Sixties music videos in Latin America were probably a little bit more absurd in a positively humorous way, just check #4 on the list. Then around the late ’70s and early ’80s, things start to get a bit more serious, for instance #10 and #2. Just look at Emmanuel pouring his heart out on stage (#8).

Many videos portray the mournful sentiment of the loss of a loved one. Looking back now, you just can’t help but laugh, cry, or do both. Even though an array of Latin breakup songs exists, we have chosen those more on the melancholic side, there are just more of them. And I’m sure that we’re missing many more classics, but that’ll be a task for blog part 2. For now, gather your box of Kleenex, snuggle blanket and pour your heart out, for your entertainment. Here’s ten old-school Latin breakup tracks and videos for all you llorones who just went through a break up.

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amanda-miguel10. “El me mintió”
by Amanda
[Argentina]

Amanda Miguel is as melodramatic as can be. And I don’t beg to differ — I’m sure she can still exceed this soap operatic performance. That’s why she’s featured in our original Remezcla thumbnail artwork! The Argentinean-now-naturalized-Mexican singer embodies all the breakup clichés on this compilation, just load get a load of the uncomfortably-close closeups in the video. But don’t blame her, the camera man didn’t know how close he was, and you can tell when you can count the layers of makeup on her face. “Él me mintió” off El Sonido Vol. 1 (1981) is a song about her ex dude lying to her for the sake of some game from this poor gal. Bummer!



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mecano453209. “Me cuesta tanto olvidarte”
by Mecano
[Spain]

It is said that the Madrileño pop band Mecano made their debut coinciding with La Movida Madrileña (read about it here), but many Spanish rock critics disagree. Then, the trio surely went on to partake in Spain’s pop music explosion of the mid ‘80s. “Me cuesta tanto olvidarte” meaning “It’s Hard to Forget You,” is Mecano’s third single released in 1986 as part of their seventh studio album Entre el Cielo y el Suelo (between heaven and earth) — the record that triggered them to international stardom. Fronted by Ana Torroja, “Me cuesta tanto olvidarte” claims that even though she ended her relationship, it was not easy, guys. Thanks for that confession, Ana.



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emanuel08. “Quiero dormir cansado”
by Emmanuel
[Mexico]

Another overly soap-operatic and theatrical performance, this one by Mexican singer Emmanuel. Bravo! He sings about going to sleep exhausted in his track “Quiero dormir cansado” because Emmanuel does not want to bear the pain from his breakup, gals! Hey this happens. This track came out in Íntimamente, his fourth album released in 1980, and gained popularity in the early ‘80s. Check out his performance and pour your heart with him if you’d like, but do take a look at those moves for kicks.



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Cristian-Castro-107. “No Podrás”
by Cristian Castro
[Mexico]

About two decades ago, Cristian Castro was a heartthrob for tons of Mexican teenybopper’s, including [major cough] myself. Okay, I was literally in first grade so please forgive me. “No Podrás” is the first single off his 1992 Agua Nueva debut. In fact, Agua Nueva was part of my first cassette collections. Major confessions over here now, eek!! View and listen to the video and song as nothing says, “I’m gonna wash this pain away” then walking on the beach shore alone wearing a double breasted suit and seeing mirages of ladies in bikinis.



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alejandra guzman06. “Hacer el amor con otro”
by Alejandra Guzmán
[Mexico]

Alejandra Guzmán was Mexico’s “Reina de corazones,” queen of hearts. She was also considered the Mexican version of Madonna back in the late ‘80s early ‘90s – provocative on stage, boisterous vocals, strong lady physiques, Grammy winners, outrageously cool outfits, and seemingly horny. “Hacer el amor con otro” meaning “to make love with another” is from her 1991 fourth album Flor de Papel. In this track, Guzmán sings in descriptive and desirous detail that making love to another isn’t the same as with her ex. Nails clawing back, tongue poisoning throat, perverted looks exchanged, breathing the same air, painfully, and teeth torching body….fuck! I really like the introductory screeching guitar riff, though.



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gloria_trevi_091_std05. “Me siento tan sola”
by Gloria Trevi
[Mexico]

The Mexican “pelo suelto” singer Gloria Trevi makes the list with her single “Me siento tan sola” off her junior Me Siento Tan Sola (1992). Crazy fact: During the mid ‘90s, this lady disappeared from the public eye along with record producer Sergio Andrade to “scout” a group of young fame-seeking chicks and deceived them by claiming to make them big stars like Gloria. Lots of other scandalous activities went on, but I’m not here to tell you this lady’s sins (because she was my teen idol). Oddly enough, her wiki page doesn’t announce any of this. Gloria payed her dues and is now she’s doing amazing! She’s released two albums since she got out of prison in Brazil. I still enjoy listening to to her early songs. “Me siento tan sola” is about her lover getting her preggo and leaving her. The title of this article is a tribute to her song.



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lo-esencial-leo-dan-cd-cover-art04. “Como te extraño, mi amor”
by Leo Dan
[Argentina]

“Como te extraño, mi amor” is the single by Argentinean singer Leopoldo Dante Tévez, commonly known as Leo Dan, off the 1964 sophomore Como Te Extraño Mi Amor. This man has been a serious busy go-getter, releasing close to 70 records, more than one per year, every year! This track had its revival when Mexico City-based Café Tacuba made a cover of it in their 1996 album Avalancha de Éxitos, making this song probably more famous than the original one. The song talks about missing an old lover too much and not knowing what to do with oneself. In the video, Leo Dan sings to a doll dressed as a stewardess and window-gazes on a Nativity scene. Don’t see a strong relation from lyrics to video, though I appreciate its irrelevancy.



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hombresg03. “Si no te tengo a tí”
by Hombres G
[Spain]

In “Si no te tengo a tí” (if I don’t have you), the Madrileño quartet confesses that there’s nothing worth living for if they can’t have their ex chick back. Yes folks, in direct lyrical interpretation is another hackneyed phrase. But don’t be fooled by overused lyrical expressions of feeling belittled by a significant other. Indeed Hombre G’s rock-pop musical style made them stand out among many of their contemporaries, and were also among the Latin bands who solidified rock en Español that emerged in the mid ‘80s. The featured single is off Hombre G’s fourth studio album Agitar Antes de Usar released in 1988 and is considered one of rock en Español’s classic albums.



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pimpinela02. “Olvídame y pega vuelta”
by Pimpinela
[Argentina]

“Olvídame y pega vuelta” is a 1983 romance-gone-sour ballad by the Argentinean duo Pimpinela. Lucía Galán and Joaquín Galán are the duo and their song is a testament of a couple breaking their relationship. But they’re brothers! Despite possible incestrous sentiments or not, the song received high acclaim and was translated into many languages, the English version being called “Get out of my life, now!” from their second album Olvídame y Pega Vuelta.



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marco-antonio-solis-stockton_1303249731541401. “Si no te hubieras ido”
by Marco Antonio Solís
[Mexico]

Damas y caballeros, Mexico’s own Marco Antonio Solís sings the ultimate soundtrack to your favorite telenovela. The passion, the heartbreak, the jealousy, and that shivering scream in the chorus, whoa! These are a few elements that makes “Si no te hubieras ido” Remezcla’s number one Latin breakup song, folks. I’m listening to it as I’m writing and it sorta feels like I’m having a painful breakup of my own, and it hurts, y’all. This song received high acclaim when it was featured on the soundtrack for Y tu mamá también, boosting the flick’s compilation to get nominated for a Grammy Award for “Best Compilation Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media.” Before the track appeared in the film and twisted our stomaches with the expected surprise, “Si no te hubieras ido” does date further back. Originally, the song written by Solís was first sung by Mexican-American singer, Marisela back in 1985. Up to this date, dozens of singers cover it, but no one does it like Marco Antonio Solís.



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Don’t agree and feel we missed an essential mourning singer? Sound off in the comments board below and let us know who we forgot to mention. Tell us your favorite too!



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